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Period of Precession - (Torque-induced - Classical Newtonian)

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body. In an appropriate reference frame it can be defined as a change in the ... more

Floating objects (weight that depresses the surface)

When an object is placed on a liquid, its weight depresses the surface, and is balanced by the surface tension forces on either side , which are each ... more

Buoyancy mass (effective mass)

The effective mass of an object which is submerged and suspended via a cord, is the mass of a reference object on the a dry-land pan of the balance that ... more

Declining Balance Method (depreciation rate)

n financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that is capable of being owned or controlled to produce value and ... more

Seiche - Period of underwater internal waves

A seiche (/ˈseɪʃ/ SAYSH) is a standing wave in an enclosed or partially enclosed body of water. Seiches and seiche-related ... more

Moment of Inertia - Rod end

Moment of inertia is the mass property of a rigid body that determines the torque needed for a desired angular acceleration about an axis of rotation. ... more

Seiche - 'c' factor related to the period of underwater internal waves

A seiche (/ˈseɪʃ/ SAYSH) is a standing wave in an enclosed or partially enclosed body of water. Seiches and seiche-related ... more

Minimum railway curve radius

The minimum railway curve radius, the shortest allowable design radius for railway tracks under a particular set of conditions. It has an important bearing ... more

Moment of inertia factor

In planetary sciences, the moment of inertia factor or normalized polar moment of inertia is a dimensionless quantity that characterizes the radial ... more

Perpendicular axis theorem ( at moments of inertia)

Perpendicular axis theorem (or plane figure theorem) can be used to determine the moment of inertia of a rigid object that lies entirely within a plane, ... more

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