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Simple gear train with two gears (gear ratio in terms of radii of the gears and number of teeth)

The gear ratio of a gear train, also known as its speed ratio, is the ratio of the angular velocity of the input gear to the angular velocity of the output ... more

Impulse (Velocity)

Impulse is the product of a force and the time, for which it acts. The impulse of a force acting for a given time interval is equal to the change in linear ... more

True anomaly - circular orbit with zero inclination

In celestial mechanics, true anomaly is an angular parameter that defines the position of a body moving along a Keplerian orbit. It is the angle between ... more

Radius from true anomaly

In celestial mechanics, true anomaly is an angular parameter that defines the position of a body moving along a Keplerian orbit. It is the angle between ... more

Radiation Pressure by Absorption (using classical electromagnetism: waves)

Radiation pressure is the pressure exerted upon any surface exposed to electromagnetic radiation. Radiation pressure implies an interaction between ... more

Simple gear train with two gears (Torque ratio)

The gear ratio of a gear train, also known as its speed ratio, is the ratio of the angular velocity of the input gear to the angular velocity of the output ... more

True anomaly - circular orbit

In celestial mechanics, true anomaly is an angular parameter that defines the position of a body moving along a Keplerian orbit. It is the angle between ... more

Nodal Precession

Nodal precession is the precession of an orbital plane around the rotation axis of an astronomical body such as Earth. This precession is due to the ... more

Drift Velocity

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains in a material due to an electric field. It can also be referred to ... more

Newton's second law Newton's second law (constant-mass system)

The second law states that the net force on an object is equal to the rate of change of its linear momentum in an inertial reference frame. The second law ... more

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