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Kepler's equation - y coordinate

In orbital mechanics, Kepler’s equation relates various geometric properties of the orbit of a body subject to a central force.

It was first ... more

Binoculars range (distance to an object)

Binoculars, field glasses or binocular telescopes are a pair of identical or mirror-symmetrical telescopes mounted side-by-side and aligned to point ... more

Electromotive force - the charge

Electromotive force, abbreviated emf (denoted ℰ and measured in volts) is the electrical intensity or “pressure” developed by a source of ... more

Rayleigh number (related to Grashof and Prandtl number)

In fluid mechanics, the Rayleigh number (Ra) for a fluid is a dimensionless number associated with buoyancy-driven flow, also known as free convection or ... more

Critical grain size (diameter)

Sediment transport is the movement of solid particles (sediment), typically due to a combination of gravity acting on the sediment, and/or the movement of ... more

Mean anomaly - function of gravitational parameter

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Law of Conservation of Linear Momentum - 3 particles example

In classical mechanics, linear momentum or translational momentum (pl. momenta; SI unit kg m/s, or equivalently, N s) is the product of the mass and ... more

Rotary variable differential transformer(RVDT) - Rotor mechanical angle

A rotary variable differential transformer (RVDT) is a type of electrical transformer used for measuring angular ... more

True anomaly - as a function of eccentric anomaly, sin form

In celestial mechanics, true anomaly is an angular parameter that defines the position of a body moving along a Keplerian orbit. It is the angle between ... more

True anomaly - as a function of eccentric anomaly, Tan form

In celestial mechanics, true anomaly is an angular parameter that defines the position of a body moving along a Keplerian orbit. It is the angle between ... more

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