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Margin of safety for failure load (measure of requirement verification)

Many agencies and organizations (such as aerospace) define the margin of safety (MoS or M.S.) including the design factor, in other words, the margin of ... more

Tuning fork (cylindrical prongs)

A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually ... more

True anomaly - circular orbit with zero inclination

In celestial mechanics, true anomaly is an angular parameter that defines the position of a body moving along a Keplerian orbit. It is the angle between ... more

Force between two bar magnets

The Gilbert model assumes that the magnetic forces between magnets are due to magnetic charges near the poles. This model produces good approximations that ... more

Drift velocity in a current-carrying metallic ohmic conductor

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains due to an electric field.

In terms of the basic ... more

Plateau–Rayleigh instability

The Plateau–Rayleigh instability, often just called the Rayleigh instability, explains why and how a falling stream of fluid breaks up into smaller packets ... more

Euler's pump and turbine equation

The Euler’s pump and turbine equations are most fundamental equations in the field of turbo-machinery. These equations govern the power, efficiencies and ... more

Rayleigh Scattering Cross-Section

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

Area of a circular sector (radians)

Circular arc is a segment of a circle. A circular sector or circle sector is the portion of a disk enclosed by two radii and an arc, where the smaller area ... more

Drift velocity in a current-carrying metallic conductor

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains due to an electric field. In general, an electron will 'rattle ... more

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