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Area of a circular sector (degrees)

Circular arc is a segment of a circle. A circular sector or circle sector is the portion of a disk enclosed by two radii and an arc, where the smaller area ... more

Area of a circular segment

Circular segment is a region of a circle which is “cut off” from the rest of the circle by a secant or a chord. More formally, a circular ... more

Orbit Equation

In astrodynamics an orbit equation defines the path of orbiting body around central body relative to , without specifying position as a function of time. ... more

Length of the perimeter of a circular sector

Circular arc is a segment of a circle. A circular sector or circle sector is the portion of a disk enclosed by two radii and an arc, where the smaller area ... more

3-sphere radius

In mathematics, a 3-sphere is a higher-dimensional analogue of a sphere. It consists of the set of points equidistant from a fixed central point in ... more

Rayleigh Scattering - Intensity of Light from molecules

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

Rayleigh Scattering - Intensity of Light

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

Time delay for a signal from Earth to a Satelite in geostationary orbit and back

A geostationary orbit, geostationary Earth orbit or geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), is an orbit whose position in the sky ... more

Kepler's equation - X coordinate

In orbital mechanics, Kepler’s equation relates various geometric properties of the orbit of a body subject to a central force.

It was first ... more

Length of an arc of a circle (central angle in radians)

Circular arc is a segment of a circle, or of its circumference (boundary) if the circle is considered to be a disc. Central angle is an angle whose apex ... more

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