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Rhombus' incircle radius

The inradius (the radius of the incircle of the rhombus) can be expressed in terms of the diagonals.

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Area of rhombus (by diagonals)

Rhombus is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral whose four sides all have the same length. Every rhombus is a parallelogram, and a rhombus with ... more

Rhombus area (trigonometric function)

A rhombus (◊), plural rhombi or rhombuses, is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral all of whose four sides have the same length. Another name is ... more

Perimeter of a rhombus

A rhombus is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral all of whose four sides have the same length. A perimeter of a rhombus is a path that surrounds ... more

Relation between the sides of an Equilateral triangle and its circumradius and inradius

An equilateral triangle is a triangle in which all three sides are equal. In traditional or Euclidean geometry, equilateral triangles are also equiangular; ... more

Inradius of arbitrary triangle

The radius of the inscribed circle of an arbitrary triangle is related to the altitudes of the triangle

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Product of the inradius and circumradius of a triangle

A circumscribed circle or circumcircle of a triangle is a circle which passes through all the vertices of the triangle. The center of this circle is called ... more

Regular Octagon Area (related to the inradius)

Octagon is a polygon that has eight sides.
A regular octagon is a closed figure with sides of the same length and internal angles of the same size. ... more

Relation between the inradius and exradii of a right triangle

Right triangle or right-angled triangle is a triangle in which one angle is a right angle (that is, a 90-degree angle). The incircle or inscribed circle of ... more

One of the legs of a right triangle related to the inradius and the other leg.

Right triangle or right-angled triangle is a triangle in which one angle is a right angle (that is, a 90-degree angle). The incircle or inscribed circle of ... more

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