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Roll angular inertia (Automobile handling)

Automobile handling and vehicle handling are descriptions of the way wheeled vehicles perform transverse to their direction of motion, particularly during ... more

Period of Precession - (Torque-induced - Classical Newtonian)

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body. In an appropriate reference frame it can be defined as a change in the ... more

Mean anomaly

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Logarithmic compounded return ( force of interest)

In finance, return is a profit on an investment. It comprises any change in value, and interest or dividends or other such cash flows which the investor ... more

Mean anomaly at epoch

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Dilution

Dilution is a reduction in the concentration of a chemical (gas, vapor, solution). It is the process of reducing the concentration of a solute in solution, ... more

Mean angular motion

In orbital mechanics, mean motion (represented by n) is the angular speed required for a body to complete one orbit, assuming constant speed in a circular ... more

Inverse-square law gravitational field ( free-fall time for two point objects on a radial path)

Two objects in space orbiting each other in the absence of other forces are in free fall around each other. The motion of two objects moving radially ... more

Precession (Torque-free)

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body. In an appropriate reference frame it can be defined as a change in the ... more

Radial acceleration in circular motion

Uniform circular motion, that is constant speed along a circular path, is an example of a body experiencing acceleration resulting in velocity of a ... more

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