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Mean anomaly at epoch

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Solid angle (in spherical coordinates)

In geometry, a solid angle is the two-dimensional angle in three-dimensional space that an object subtends at a point. It is a measure of how large the ... more

Gravity Acceleration by Altitude

The gravity of Earth, which is denoted by g, refers to the acceleration that the Earth imparts to objects on or near its surface due to gravity. In SI ... more

Rayleigh Scattering - Intensity of Light from molecules

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

Parallel axis theorem ( at mass moment of inertia)

Parallel axis theorem ( Huygens –Steiner theorem) , can be used to determine the mass moment of inertia or the second moment of area of a rigid body about ... more

Black hole surface gravity

The surface gravity, g, of an astronomical or other object is the gravitational acceleration experienced at its surface. The surface gravity may be thought ... more

Magnification of the lens

Converging lens in air will focus a collimated beam travelling along the lens axis to a spot (known as the focal point) at a distance “f” from ... more

Specific Relative Angular Momentum - Elliptical orbit

In celestial mechanics, the specific relative angular momentum (h) of two orbiting bodies is the vector product of the relative position and the relative ... more

Apsis - Periapsis minimum distance

An apsis, plural apsidesis a point of greatest or least distance of a body in an elliptic orbit about a larger body. For a body orbiting the Sun the ... more

Apsis - Apoapsis maximum distance

An apsis, plural apsidesis a point of greatest or least distance of a body in an elliptic orbit about a larger body. For a body orbiting the Sun the ... more

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