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Hooke's law for continuous media

Hooke’s law states that the force needed to extend or compress a spring by some distance is proportional to that distance.The stresses and strains ... more

Drift Velocity (with current and conductor section area)

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains in a material due to an electric field. It can also be referred to ... more

Benford's Law

Benford’s Law, also called the First-Digit Law, refers to the frequency distribution of digits in many (but not all) real-life sources of data. In ... more

Stokes' law (Excess force due to the difference of the weight of the sphere and the buoyancy on the sphere)

The weight of an object is the force on the object due to gravity. Buoyancy is an upward force exerted by a fluid that opposes the weight of an immersed ... more

Weight transfer ( or load transfer)

In the automobile industry, weight transfer customarily refers to the change in load borne by different wheels during acceleration and the change in ... more

Atwood number

The Atwood number is a dimensionless number in fluid dynamics used in the study of hydrodynamic instabilities in density stratified flows. It is a ... more

Earnings before interest and taxes

In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm’s profit that includes all ... more

Link Budget - Received Power

A link budget is accounting of all of the gains and losses from the transmitter, through the medium (free space, cable, waveguide, fiber, etc.) to the ... more

Reaction quotient

In chemistry, a reaction quotient: Qr is a function of the activities or concentrations of the chemical species involved in a chemical reaction. In the ... more

Absolute Magnitude of a Star - with distance modulus

Absolute magnitude is the measure of a celestial object’s intrinsic brightness. It is the hypothetical apparent magnitude of an object at a standard ... more

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