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Collision Frequency

Collision theory is a theory proposed independently by Max Trautz in 1916 and William Lewis in 1918, that qualitatively explains how chemical reactions ... more

Reaction quotient

In chemistry, a reaction quotient: Qr is a function of the activities or concentrations of the chemical species involved in a chemical reaction. In the ... more

Hole change in Gibbs free energy

In chemistry, a reaction quotient: Qr is a function of the activities or concentrations of the chemical species involved in a chemical reaction. In the ... more

First-order reaction (rate of disintegration)

A first-order reaction depends on the concentration of only one reactant (a unimolecular reaction). Other reactants can be present, but ... more

Tritration ( concentration of the analyte)

Titration, also known as titrimetry or volumetric analysis, is a common laboratory method of quantitative chemical analysis that is used to determine the ... more

Rate constant (collisions in chemical reactions)

Collision theory qualitatively explains how chemical reactions occur and why reaction rates differ for different reactions. The collision theory states ... more

Van 't Hoff equation

The Van 't Hoff equation in chemical thermodynamics relates the change in the equilibrium constant, Keq, of a chemical equilibrium to the change in ... more

Michaelis–Menten enzyme kinetics (maximum reaction rate)

Michaelis–Menten kinetics is one of the best-known models of enzyme kinetics.The model takes the form of an equation describing the rate of enzymatic ... more

Diffusion Coefficient - related to Fick's laws of diffusion

Diffusion is the net movement of a substance (e.g., an atom, ion or molecule) from a region of high concentration to a region of low concentration. This is ... more

Cross Section

The cross section is an effective area that quantifies the intrinsic likelihood of a scattering event when an incident beam strikes a target object, made ... more

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