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Triangle wave (in trigonometric terms)

A triangle wave is a non-sinusoidal waveform named for its triangular shape. It is a periodic, piecewise linear, continuous real function. Like a square ... more

Sawtooth wave

The sawtooth wave (or saw wave) is a kind of non-sinusoidal waveform. The convention is that a sawtooth wave ramps upward and then sharply drops. However, ... more

Doppler Effect - for stationary observer

The Doppler effect is the change in frequency of a wave (or other periodic event) for an observer moving relative to its source. When the speeds of source ... more

Sine wave

The sine wave or sinusoid is a mathematical curve that describes a smooth repetitive oscillation. It is named after the function sine, of which it is the ... more

Rayleigh Scattering - Intensity of Light from molecules

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

Laplace domain ( series RLC circuit)

The series RLC can be analyzed for both transient and steady AC state behavior using the Laplace transform. If the voltage source ... more

Rayleigh Scattering - Intensity of Light

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

RC circuit (Voltage of the resistor at Series circuit)

A resistor–capacitor circuit (RC circuit), or RC filter or RC network, is an electric circuit composed of resistors and capacitors driven by a voltage or ... more

RC circuit (Voltage of the capacitor at Series circuit

A resistor–capacitor circuit (RC circuit), or RC filter, is an electric circuit composed of resistors and capacitors driven by a voltage or current source. ... more

RC circuit ( the current at circuit in series)

A resistor–capacitor circuit (RC circuit), or RC filter, is an electric circuit composed of resistors and capacitors driven by a voltage or current source. ... more

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