Horizontal curve - Sight obstraction distance (S<L)

Description

Horizontal curve – Sight Distance Properties (S<L)

Horizontal Curves are one of the two important transition elements in geometric design for highways (along with Vertical Curves). A horizontal curve provides a transition between two tangent strips of roadway, allowing a vehicle to negotiate a turn at a gradual rate rather than a sharp cut. The design of the curve is dependent on the intended design speed for the roadway, as well as other factors including drainage and friction. These curves are semicircles as to provide the driver with a constant turning rate with radii determined by the laws of physics surrounding centripetal force.

Unlike straight, level roads that would have a clear line of sight for a great distance, horizontal curves pose a unique challenge. Natural terrain within the inside of the curve, such as trees, cliffs, or buildings, can potentially block a driver’s view of the upcoming road if placed too close to the road. As a result, the acceptable design speed is often reduced to account for sight distance restrictions.

Two scenarios exist when computing the acceptable sight distance for a given curve. The first is where the sight distance is determined to be less than the curve length. The second is where the sight distance exceeds the curve length. Each scenario has a respective formula that produces sight distance based on geometric properties. Determining which scenario is the correct one often requires testing both to find out which is true.

Given a certain sight distance, a known curve length and inner lane center-line radius, the distance a sight obstraction can be from the interior edge of the road, can be determined as shown here.

Related formulas

Variables

Mssight obstraction distance, (m) (dimensionless)
Rvinner lane centerline radius (dimensionless)
Ssight distance, (m) (dimensionless)