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Terminal velocity (creeping flow conditions)

The terminal velocity of a falling object is the velocity of the object when the sum of the drag force and buoyancy equals the downward force of gravity ... more

Settling velocity (Stokes law)

Stokes’ law can be used to calculate the viscosity of a fluid. Stokes’ law is also important in the study for Viscous Drag , Terminal Velocity ... more

Characteristic Length

In physics, a characteristic length is an important dimension that defines the scale of a physical system. Often, such a length is used as an input to a ... more

Drag equation ( for fluids)

Drag (sometimes called air resistance, a type of friction, or fluid resistance, another type of friction or fluid friction) refers to forces acting ... more

Wind Chill - North American and UK - Fahrenheit scale

Wind-chill or windchill, (popularly wind chill factor) is the perceived decrease in air temperature felt by the body on exposed skin due to the flow of ... more

Wind Chill - North American and UK - Celsius scale

Wind-chill or windchill, (popularly wind chill factor) is the perceived decrease in air temperature felt by the body on exposed skin due to the flow of ... more

Pump energy (centrifugal pump)

Centrifugal pumps are a sub-class of dynamic axis-symmetric work-absorbing turbo-machinery.The rotational energy typically comes from an engine or electric ... more

Head loss in terms of volumetric flow rate

Hydraulic head or piezometric head is a specific measurement of liquid pressure above a geodetic datum.
In any real moving fluid, energy is dissipated ... more

Reynolds number - Flow in a pipe with mass flow rate

For flow in a pipe or tube, the Reynolds number is generally defined as presented here.

For shapes such as squares, rectangular or annular ducts ... more

Total volume of the two spherical caps of two intersecting spheres

A spherical cap or spherical dome is a portion of a sphere cut off by a plane. If the plane passes through the center of the sphere, so that the height of ... more

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