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Hyperbolic triangle ( length of the base)

A hyperbolic sector is a region of the Cartesian plane {(x,y)} bounded by rays from the origin to two points (a, 1/a) and (b, 1/b) and by the hyperbola xy ... more

Hyperbolic triangle ( length of the altitude)

A hyperbolic sector is a region of the Cartesian plane {(x,y)} bounded by rays from the origin to two points (a, 1/a) and (b, 1/b) and by the hyperbola xy ... more

Magic hypercube

In mathematics, a magic hypercube is the k-dimensional generalization of magic squares, magic cubes and magic tesseracts; that is, a number of integers ... more

Right triangle altitude theorem

The right triangle altitude theorem or geometric mean theorem is a result in elementary geometry that describes a relation between the altitude on the ... more

Theorem of internal triangle's bisector

The bisector of an angle of a triangle divides the opposite side in two segments that are proportional to the other two sides of the triangle

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Diameter of a triangle's circumscribed circle (related the angles)

The circumscribed circle or circumcircle of a triangle is a circle which passes through all the vertices of the triangle. The circumcenter of a triangle ... more

Relation between the altitude to the hypotenuse and the legs of a right triangle

Right triangle or right-angled triangle is a triangle in which one angle is a right angle (that is, a 90-degree angle). Altitude of a triangle is a line ... more

Law of sines at the hyperbolic triangle

A hyperbolic triangle is a triangle in the hyperbolic plane. It consists of three line segments called sides or edges and three points called angles or ... more

Stewart's Theorem ( for triangle's medians)

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Sum of the ratios on the three altitudes of the distance of the orthocenter from the base to the length of the altitude

Altitude of a triangle is a line segment through a vertex and perpendicular to a line containing the base (the opposite side of the triangle). This line ... more

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