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Rhombus' incircle radius

The inradius (the radius of the incircle of the rhombus) can be expressed in terms of the diagonals.

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Rhombus area (trigonometric function)

A rhombus (◊), plural rhombi or rhombuses, is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral all of whose four sides have the same length. Another name is ... more

Area of rhombus (circumscribed)

Rhombus is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral whose four sides all have the same length. The can be calculated by the semi perimeter and the ... more

Perimeter of a rhombus

A rhombus is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral all of whose four sides have the same length. A perimeter of a rhombus is a path that surrounds ... more

Parallelogram area ( diagonals' angle)

Parallelogram is a simple (non self-intersecting) quadrilateral with two pairs of parallel sides. The opposite or facing sides of a parallelogram are of ... more

Parallelogram law

Parallelogram is a simple quadrilateral with two pairs of parallel sides. The opposite or facing sides of a parallelogram are of equal length and the ... more

Area of a convex quadrilateral (in trigonometric terms)

Quadrilateral is a polygon with four sides (or edges) and four vertices or corners. The area of a convex quadrilateral can be expressed in trigonometric ... more

Cyclic quadrilateral (Ptolemy's theorem)

In Euclidean geometry, a cyclic quadrilateral or inscribed quadrilateral is a quadrilateral whose vertices all lie on a single circle. This circle is ... more

Area of a convex quadrilateral (in terms of sides and angle θ of the diagonals)

Quadrilateral is a polygon with four sides (or edges) and four vertices or corners. The area of a quadrilateral can be calculated by the sides and the ... more

Cyclic quadrilateral (Length of the diagonal opposite angle A)

In Euclidean geometry, a cyclic quadrilateral or inscribed quadrilateral is a quadrilateral whose vertices all lie on a single circle. This circle is ... more

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