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Sag curve length when S>L (Vertical curves for highway design)

When a driver is driving on a sag curve at night, the sight distance is limited by the higher grade in front of the vehicle. This distance must be long ... more

Mean anomaly - function of mean longitude

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Stewart's Theorem ( for triangle's medians)

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Radial Kepler equation

In orbital mechanics, Kepler’s equation relates various geometric properties of the orbit of a body subject to a central force.

It was first ... more

Transformed Exponential Function

In general, an exponential function is one of an exponential form , where the base is “b” and the exponent is “x”. In general, the ... more

Couple balance

Rotating unbalance is the uneven distribution of mass around an axis of rotation. A rotating mass, or rotor, is said to be out of balance when its center ... more

Free-fall time (Infall of a spherically-symmetric distribution of mass)

The free-fall time is the characteristic time that would take a body to collapse under its own gravitational attraction, if no other forces existed to ... more

Backlash (due to tooth thickness changes)

In mechanical engineering, backlash, sometimes called lash or play, is clearance or lost motion in a mechanism caused by gaps between the parts. It can be ... more

Mean anomaly

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Center of mass of a uniform trapezoid

Trapezoid is a convex quadrilateral with only one pair of parallel sides. The parallel sides are called the bases of the trapezoid and the other two sides ... more

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