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Instantaneous power for L1 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Hole change in Gibbs free energy

In chemistry, a reaction quotient: Qr is a function of the activities or concentrations of the chemical species involved in a chemical reaction. In the ... more

Magnetic dipole moment (Ampère model)

Far away from a magnet, its magnetic field is almost always described (to a good approximation) by a dipole field characterized by its total magnetic ... more

Poisson Distribution

In probability theory and statistics, the Poisson distribution (French pronunciation [pwasɔ̃]; in English usually /ˈpwɑːsɒn/), named after French ... more

Dittus-Boelter equation - Nusselt number

In heat transfer at a boundary (surface) within a fluid, the Nusselt number (Nu) is the ratio of convective to conductive heat transfer across (normal to) ... more

Future value of a growing annuity

Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future, based on the value of that asset in the present. Future value of an ... more

Stress-Optic Law

Photoelasticity is an experimental method to determine the stress distribution in a material.Unlike the analytical methods of stress determination, ... more

Instantaneous power for L2 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Instantaneous power for L3 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Collision Frequency

Collision theory is a theory proposed independently by Max Trautz in 1916 and William Lewis in 1918, that qualitatively explains how chemical reactions ... more

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