'

Search results

Found 649 matches
Larmor formula

The Larmor formula is used to calculate the total power radiated by a non relativistic point charge as it accelerates or decelerates. This is used in the ... more

Total constant power (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Electric Current

An electric current is a flow of electric charge. In electric circuits this charge is often carried by moving electrons in a wire. It can also be carried ... more

Total constant power (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Solar luminosity

is a unit of radiant flux (power emitted in the form of photons) conventionally used by astronomers to measure the luminosity of stars. It is defined in ... more

Electromotive force - the charge

Electromotive force, abbreviated emf (denoted ℰ and measured in volts) is the electrical intensity or “pressure” developed by a source of ... more

Instantaneous power for L1 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Damping ratio (related to Quality factor)

Formula first contributed by:
trooper

In engineering, the damping ratio is a dimensionless measure describing how ... more

Instantaneous power for L2 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Instantaneous power for L3 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

...can't find what you're looking for?

Create a new formula