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Euler's theorem (excircles)

The circumscribed circle or circumcircle of a triangle is a circle which passes through all the vertices of the triangle. The center of this circle is ... more

Area of rhombus (circumscribed)

Rhombus is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral whose four sides all have the same length. The can be calculated by the semi perimeter and the ... more

Equilateral triangle - semiperimeter

In geometry, an equilateral triangle is a triangle in which all three sides are equal. In the familiar Euclidean geometry, an equilateral triangle is also ... more

Torsion constant (Circle -cross-sectional shape)

In solid mechanics, torsion is the twisting of an object due to an applied torque. The torsion constant is a geometrical property of a bar’s ... more

Guided ray (acceptance angle)

A guided ray (also bound ray or trapped ray) is a ray of light in a multi-mode optical fiber ( type of optical fiber mostly used for communication over ... more

Cyclic quadrilateral (Length of the diagonal opposite angle B)

In Euclidean geometry, a cyclic quadrilateral or inscribed quadrilateral is a quadrilateral whose vertices all lie on a single circle. This circle is ... more

Cyclic quadrilateral (tangent of the acute angle between the diagonals)

In Euclidean geometry, a cyclic quadrilateral or inscribed quadrilateral is a quadrilateral whose vertices all lie on a single circle. This circle is ... more

Pressure in a Contact Area between two spheres

Contact mechanics is the study of the deformation of solids that touch each other at one or more points. Hertzian contact stress refers to the localized ... more

Spherical wedge (Volume)

A spherical wedge or ungula is a portion of a ball bounded by two plane semidisks and a spherical lune (termed the wedge’s base). The angle between ... more

Cyclic quadrilateral (sine of an angle)

In Euclidean geometry, a cyclic quadrilateral or inscribed quadrilateral is a quadrilateral whose vertices all lie on a single circle. This circle is ... more

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