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Compound pendulum (momemt of inertia)

A compound pendulum is a body formed from an assembly of particles or continuous shapes that rotates rigidly around a pivot. Its moments of inertia is the ... more

Static balance

Rotating unbalance is the uneven distribution of mass around an axis of rotation. A rotating mass, or rotor, is said to be out of balance when its center ... more

Roll angular inertia (Automobile handling)

Automobile handling and vehicle handling are descriptions of the way wheeled vehicles perform transverse to their direction of motion, particularly during ... more

Moments of inertia for a solid tetrahedron

In physics and applied mathematics, the mass moment of inertia, measures the extent to which an object resists rotational acceleration about an axis, and ... more

Uniform Circular Motion position (Y - coordinate)

In physics, circular motion is a movement of an object along the circumference of a circle or rotation along a circular path. It can be uniform, with ... more

Uniform Circular Motion position (X - coordinate)

In physics, circular motion is a movement of an object along the circumference of a circle or rotation along a circular path. It can be uniform, with ... more

Moment of Inertia - Right Circular Cone - z axis

In physics and applied mathematics, the mass moment of inertia, usually denoted by I, measures the extent to which an object resists rotational ... more

Couple balance

Rotating unbalance is the uneven distribution of mass around an axis of rotation. A rotating mass, or rotor, is said to be out of balance when its center ... more

Parallel axis theorem ( at mass moment of inertia)

Parallel axis theorem ( Huygens –Steiner theorem) , can be used to determine the mass moment of inertia or the second moment of area of a rigid body about ... more

Moment of Inertia - Sphere (solid) - y axis

In physics and applied mathematics, the mass moment of inertia, usually denoted by I, measures the extent to which an object resists rotational ... more

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