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Morley's trisector theorem (area)

Morley’s trisector theorem states that in any triangle, the three points of intersection of the adjacent angle trisectors form an equilateral triangle, ... more

Stewart's Theorem

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Orthodiagonal quadrilateral ( circumradii of the four triangles)

A quadrilateral is a polygon with four sides (or edges) and four vertices or corners. An orthodiagonal quadrilateral is a quadrilateral in which the ... more

Diameter of a triangle's circumscribed circle (related the angles)

The circumscribed circle or circumcircle of a triangle is a circle which passes through all the vertices of the triangle. The circumcenter of a triangle ... more

Law of sines at the hyperbolic triangle

A hyperbolic triangle is a triangle in the hyperbolic plane. It consists of three line segments called sides or edges and three points called angles or ... more

Law of cotangents (in term of tangents)

In trigonometry, the law of cotangents is a relationship among the lengths of the sides of a triangle and the cotangents of the halves of the three angles. ... more

Antiprism uniform (Volume)

In geometry, an n-sided antiprism is a polyhedron composed of two parallel copies of some particular n-sided polygon, connected by an alternating band of ... more

Triangle area

Triangle is a polygon with three edges and three vertices. The area of a triangle with base length b and height length h is given by multiplying base ... more

Hyperbolic law of cosines - 2nd law

In hyperbolic geometry, the law of cosines is a pair of theorems relating the sides and angles of triangles on a hyperbolic plane, analogous to the planar ... more

Hyperbolic law of haversines

In hyperbolic geometry, the law of cosines is a pair of theorems relating the sides and angles of triangles on a hyperbolic plane, analogous to the planar ... more

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