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Sears–Haack body (Wave Drag related to the Volume)

The Sears–Haack body is the shape with the lowest theoretical wave drag in supersonic flow, for a given body length and given volume. The mathematical ... more

Charles's law

Charles’ law is an experimental gas law which describes how gases tend to expand when heated. When the pressure on a sample of a dry gas is held ... more

Settling velocity (Stokes law)

Stokes’ law can be used to calculate the viscosity of a fluid. Stokes’ law is also important in the study for Viscous Drag , Terminal Velocity ... more

Parallel Thermal Resistance in composite walls (conduction)

Thermal resistance is a heat property and a measurement of a temperature difference by which an object or material resists a heat flow. Thermal resistance ... more

Speed of sound in three-dimensional solids (pressure waves)

The speed of sound is the distance travelled per unit of time by a sound wave propagating through an elastic medium. Sound travels faster in liquids and ... more

Sears–Haack body (Wave Drag related to the maximum Radius)

The Sears–Haack body is the shape with the lowest theoretical wave drag in supersonic flow, for a given body length and given volume. The mathematical ... more

Freundlich adsorption isotherm

Adsorption is usually described through isotherms, that is, the amount of adsorbate on the adsorbent as a function of its pressure (if gas) or ... more

Gyrofrequency

If the magnetic field is uniform and all other forces are absent, then the Lorentz force will cause a particle to undergo a constant acceleration ... more

Second moment of area - Hollow Rectangular profile

The second moment of area, also known as moment of inertia of plane area, area moment of inertia, polar moment of area or second area moment, is a ... more

Freundlich adsorption isotherm (alternative version)

Adsorption is usually described through isotherms, that is, the amount of adsorbate on the adsorbent as a function of its pressure (if gas) or ... more

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