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Ball Screw - Frictional Resistance

A ball screw is a mechanical linear actuator that translates rotational motion to linear motion with little friction. A threaded shaft provides a helical ... more

Rayleigh number (for the mushy zone of a solidifying alloy - related to isotherm speed)

In fluid mechanics, the Rayleigh number (Ra) for a fluid is a dimensionless number associated with buoyancy-driven flow, also known as free convection or ... more

Angle of elevation (for object following a ballistic trajectory)

A trajectory or flight path is the path that a moving object follows through space as a function of time. A trajectory can be described mathematically ... more

Friction Loss (turbulent flow)

In fluid flow, friction loss (or skin friction) is the loss of pressure or “head” that occurs in pipe or duct flow due to the effect of the fluid’s ... more

Half-Life

Half-life is the amount of time required for the amount of something to fall to half its initial value. The term is very commonly used in nuclear physics ... more

Energy–Maneuverability Theory (aircraft performance)

Energy–maneuverability theory is a model of aircraft performance. It was developed by Col. John Boyd, and is useful in describing an aircraft’s ... more

Energy of damped harmonic motion

Damped harmonic motion is a real oscillation, in which an object is hanging on a spring. Because of the existence of internal friction and air resistance, ... more

Linear damping oscillation

Damped harmonic motion is a real oscillation, in which an object is hanging on a spring. Because of the existence of internal friction and air resistance, ... more

Specific Impulse by weight

Specific impulse (usually abbreviated Isp) is a measure of the efficiency of rocket and jet engines. By definition, it is the impulse delivered per unit of ... more

Specific Impulse

Specific impulse (usually abbreviated Isp) is a way to describe the efficiency of rocket and jet engines. It represents the force with respect to the ... more

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