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Heat flow in electronics - maximum power dissipate

The heat flow can be modelled by analogy to an electrical circuit where heat flow is represented by current, temperatures are represented by voltages, heat ... more

Energy stored in a system of three point charges

Electric potential energy, or electrostatic potential energy, is a potential energy that results from conservative Coulomb forces and is associated with ... more

Shockley ideal diode equation

In electronics, a diode is a two-terminal electronic component with asymmetric conductance; it has low (ideally zero) resistance to current in one ... more

Q factor for a series resonant circuit (RC circuits)

It is defined as the peak energy stored in the circuit divided by the average energy dissipated in it per cycle at resonance; Q factor is directly ... more

Q factor for a series resonant circuit (RL circuits)

It is defined as the peak energy stored in the circuit divided by the average energy dissipated in it per cycle at resonance; Q factor is directly ... more

Magnitude of Admittance in electrical circuit

In electrical engineering, admittance is a measure of how easily a circuit or device will allow a current to flow. It is defined as the inverse of ... more

Admittance (related to resistance and reactance)

In electrical engineering, admittance is a measure of how easily a circuit or device will allow a current to flow. It is defined as the inverse of ... more

Signal Attenuation

In physics, attenuation (in some contexts also called extinction) is the gradual loss in intensity of any kind of flux through a medium. For instance, dark ... more

Electric Intensity

Electric field intensity is the strength of an electric field at any point. It is equal to the electric force per unit charge experienced by a test charge ... more

Drift velocity in a current-carrying metallic conductor

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains due to an electric field. In general, an electron will 'rattle ... more

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