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Tractrix (General formula-cartesian coordinates)

Tractrix is the curve along which an object moves, under the influence of friction, when pulled on a horizontal plane by a line segment attached to a ... more

X-Coordinate of the vertex, of the parabola of a Quadratic Function

Parabolas with axes of symmetry parallel to the y-axis have equations of the form y=ax^2+bx+c.
The x-coordinate and y-coordinate at the vertex can be ... more

Equation of an ellipse

Ellipse is a curve on a plane surrounding two focal points such that a straight line drawn from one of the focal points to any point on the curve and then ... more

Mean anomaly at epoch

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Horizontal Hyperbola (Standard Equation)

Hyperbola is the set of all points in the plane, such that the absolute value of the difference of each of the distances from two fixed points is constant. ... more

Vertical Hyperbola (Standard Equation)

Hyperbola is the set of all points in the plane, such that the absolute value of the difference of each of the distances from two fixed points is constant. ... more

Mean anomaly

In celestial mechanics, the mean anomaly is an angle used in calculating the position of a body in an elliptical orbit in the classical two-body problem. ... more

Cissoid of Diocles (Cartesian coordinates)

The Cissoid of Diocles is a cubic plane curve member of the conchoid of de Sluze family of curves and in form it resembles a tractrix.( Tractix is the ... more

Tacnode (Cartesian coordinates)

A tacnode (also called a point of osculation or double cusp) is a kind of singular point of a curve. It is defined as a point where two (or more) ... more

Absolute Magnitude of a Star - with luminosity distance

Absolute magnitude is the measure of a celestial object’s intrinsic brightness. It is the hypothetical apparent magnitude of an object at a standard ... more

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