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Equidiagonal quadrilateral (Area)

A quadrilateral is a polygon with four sides (or edges) and four vertices or corner. An equidiagonal quadrilateral is a convex quadrilateral whose two ... more

Radius of the circle with perimeter (circumference)

In classical geometry, a radius of a circle or sphere is any of the line segments from its center to its perimeter, and in more modern usage, it is also ... more

Velocity of a simple harmonic motion

A simple harmonic motion is a type of periodic motion where the restoring force is directly proportional to the displacement. The motion is sinusoidal in ... more

Pythagorean triangle ( hypotenuse)

A Pythagorean triangle is right angled and Heronian. Its three integer sides are known as a Pythagorean triple or Pythagorean triplet or Pythagorean triad. ... more

Superformula - Polar Equation

The superformula is a generalization of the superellipse and was first proposed by Johan Gielis in 2003. Gielis suggested that the formula can be used to ... more

Cell voltage

A galvanic cell, or voltaic cell, named after Luigi Galvani, or Alessandro Volta respectively, is an electrochemical cell that derives electrical energy ... more

Nose cone ogive shape (radius y at any point x)

Nose cone section of any vehicle or body meant to travel through a compressible fluid medium (such as a rocket or aircraft, missile or bullet) has several ... more

Nose cone ( center of the spherical nose cap)

The nose cone section of any vehicle or body meant to travel through a compressible fluid medium (such as a rocket or aircraft, missile or bullet) is ... more

Pythagorean triangle ( "b" side)

A Pythagorean triangle is right angled and Heronian. Its three integer sides are known as a Pythagorean triple or Pythagorean triplet or Pythagorean triad. ... more

Length of internal bisector of an angle in triangle in relation to the opposite segments

In geometry, bisection is the division of something into two equal or congruent parts, usually by a line, which is then called a bisector. If the internal ... more

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