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Shockley diode equation (small forward bias voltages)

In electronics, a diode is a two-terminal electronic component with asymmetric conductance; it has low (ideally zero) resistance to current in one ... more

Electron's energy

n atomic physics, the Rutherford–Bohr model or Bohr model, depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in ... more

Relation between Polarization density and Electric field in various materials

In classical electromagnetism, polarization density is the vector field that expresses the density of permanent or induced electric dipole moments in a ... more

Einstein relation (Electrical mobility equation)

Electrical mobility is the ability of charged particles (such as electrons or protons) to move through a medium in response to an electric field that is ... more

Compton scattering

Compton scattering is an inelastic scattering of a photon by a free charged particle, usually an electron. It results in a decrease in energy (increase in ... more

Voltage gain

In electronics, gain is a measure of the ability of a two-port circuit (often an amplifier) to increase the power or amplitude of a signal from the input ... more

Probability that an electron hits an ion at ionization process

Ionization is the process by which an atom or a molecule acquires a negative or positive charge by gaining or losing electrons to form ions. If an electron ... more

Solar Cell - Fill Factor (with maximum power point)

Solar cell efficiency is the ratio of the electrical output of a solar cell to the incident energy in the form of sunlight. The energy conversion ... more

Linear charge density

Linear density is the measure of a quantity of any characteristic value per unit of length. Llinear charge density (the amount of electric charge per unit ... more

Electromotive force - the charge

Electromotive force, abbreviated emf (denoted â„° and measured in volts) is the electrical intensity or “pressure” developed by a source of ... more

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