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Kelvin–Helmholtz mechanism

The Kelvin–Helmholtz mechanism is an astronomical process that occurs when the surface of a star or a planet cools. The cooling causes the pressure to ... more

NTU method - the heat transferred between the fluids (q)

The Number of Transfer Units (NTU) Method is used to calculate the rate of heat transfer in heat exchangers (especially counter ... more

Absolute Magnitude of a Star - with parallax

Absolute magnitude is the measure of a celestial object’s intrinsic brightness. It is the hypothetical apparent magnitude of an object at a standard ... more

Luminosity for a black body

In astronomy, luminosity is the total amount of energy emitted by a star, galaxy, or other astronomical object per unit time. It is related to the ... more

Absolute Magnitude of a Star - with luminosity distance

Absolute magnitude is the measure of a celestial object’s intrinsic brightness. It is the hypothetical apparent magnitude of an object at a standard ... more

Thermal efficiency of a heat engine

Heat engines transform thermal energy, or heat into mechanical energy, or work. They cannot do this task perfectly, so some of the input heat energy is not ... more

Power (aerodynamic drag)

In fluid dynamics, drag (sometimes called air resistance, a type of friction, or fluid resistance, another type of friction or fluid friction) is a force ... more

Allowable Strength Design Load combination (eq2)

In structural engineering, a structure is a body or combination of pieces of rigid bodies in space to form a fitness system for supporting loads. ... more

Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) - Load combinations (eq5)

In structural engineering, a structure is a body or combination of pieces of rigid bodies in space to form a fitness system for supporting loads. ... more

Degree of Combined Leverage

In finance, leverage is a general term for any technique to multiply gains and losses.Most often it involves buying more of an asset by using borrowed ... more

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