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Terminal velocity (under buoyancy force)

The terminal velocity of a falling object is the velocity of the object when the sum of the drag force and buoyancy equals the downward force of gravity ... more

Velocity of a falling object

In fluid dynamics, drag (sometimes called air resistance, a type of friction, or fluid resistance, another type of friction or fluid friction) is a force ... more

Rayleigh Scattering - Intensity of Light

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

Archie's Law

In petrophysics, Archie’s law relates the in-situ electrical conductivity of a sedimentary rock to its porosity and brine saturation as shown ... more

Borda–Carnot equation (for open channel flows)

In fluid dynamics the Borda–Carnot equation is an empirical description of the mechanical energy losses of the fluid due to a (sudden) flow expansion. The ... more

Terminal velocity (creeping flow conditions)

The terminal velocity of a falling object is the velocity of the object when the sum of the drag force and buoyancy equals the downward force of gravity ... more

Paschen's Law

In standard conditions at atmospheric pressure, gas serves as an excellent insulator, requiring the application of a significant voltage before breaking ... more

Magnetic Reynolds number (relationship to eddy current braking)

The dimensionless magnetic Reynolds number, is also used in cases where there is no physical fluid involved.

The magnetic Reynolds number is the ... more

Specific absorption rate - with Electric intensity

Specific absorption rate (SAR) is a measure of the rate at which energy is absorbed by the human body when exposed to a radio ... more

Worksheet 300

Calculate the Reynolds number N′R for a ball with a 7.40-cm diameter thrown at 40.0 m/s.

Strategy

We can use the Reynolds number equation calculate N’R , since all values in it are either given or can be found in tables of density and viscosity.

Solution

We first find the kinematic viscosity values:

Kinematic Viscosity

Substituting values into the equation for N’R yields:

Reynolds number

Discussion

This value is sufficiently high to imply a turbulent wake. Most large objects, such as airplanes and sailboats, create significant turbulence as they move. As noted before, the Bernoulli principle gives only qualitatively-correct results in such situations.

Reference : OpenStax College,College Physics. OpenStax College. 21 June 2012.
http://openstaxcollege.org/textbooks/college-physics
Creative Commons License : http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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