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Drift Velocity (with current and conductor section area)

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains in a material due to an electric field. It can also be referred to ... more

Water hammer (pressure surge)

Water hammer (or, more generally, fluid hammer) is a pressure surge or wave caused when a fluid (usually a liquid but sometimes also a gas) in motion is ... more

Brushed DC electric motor - Speed

A brushed DC motor is an internally commutated electric motor designed to be run from a direct current power source. Brushed motors were the first ... more

Specific Impulse by weight - with mass flow rate

Specific impulse (usually abbreviated Isp) is a measure of the efficiency of rocket and jet engines. By definition, it is the impulse delivered per unit of ... more

Magnetic field of circular wire

Generated at the center of a circular wire by the electric current, related to the electric current and the distance from the wire to center of the ... more

S-wave Velocity

A type of elastic wave, the S-wave, secondary wave, or shear wave (sometimes called an elastic S-wave) is one of the two main types of elastic body waves, ... more

Probability that an electron hits an ion at ionization process

Ionization is the process by which an atom or a molecule acquires a negative or positive charge by gaining or losing electrons to form ions. If an electron ... more

P-wave Velocity

P-waves are a type of elastic wave, called seismic waves in seismology, that can travel through a continuum. The continuum is made up of gases (as sound ... more

Charge of mole of ions goes into solution

If a mole of ions goes into solution the charge through the external circuit depends on the number of moles or ions and the “Faraday constant” ... more

Drift velocity in a current-carrying metallic conductor

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains due to an electric field. In general, an electron will 'rattle ... more

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