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London penetration depth

In superconductors, the London penetration depth (usually denoted as λ or λ_L) characterizes the distance to which a magnetic field penetrates into a ... more

Conic section equation

In geometry, the conic constant (or Schwarzschild constant, after Karl Schwarzschild) is a quantity describing conic sections, and is represented by the ... more

Channel bed pressure (at the bed of an open channel)

The depth–slope product is used to calculate the shear stress at the bed of an open channel containing fluid that is undergoing steady, uniform flow. The ... more

Working f-Number

In optics, the f-number (sometimes called focal ratio, f-ratio, f-stop, or relative aperture) of an optical system is the ratio of the lens’s focal ... more

Boundary shear stress (for natural rivers)

Assuming a single, well-mixed, homogeneous fluid and a single acceleration due to gravity (both are good assumptions in natural rivers, and the second is a ... more

Radius of a contact area between a sphere and an elastic half-space

Contact mechanics is the study of the deformation of solids that touch each other at one or more points. When an elastic sphere indents an elastic ... more

Radius of a Contact Area between two cylinders with parallel axes

Contact mechanics is the study of the deformation of solids that touch each other at one or more points. Hertzian contact stress refers to the localized ... more

Pressure to depth (empirical formula - sea water)

In sea water, there is an approximate numerical equivalence between the change in pressure in decibars and the change in depth from the surface in meters. ... more

Focal ratio (F-number)

In optics, the f-number (sometimes called focal ratio, f-ratio, f-stop, or relative aperture) of an optical system is the ratio of the lens’s focal ... more

Signal Attenuation

In physics, attenuation (in some contexts also called extinction) is the gradual loss in intensity of any kind of flux through a medium. For instance, dark ... more

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