'

Search results

Found 1006 matches
Ceva's theorem (lines from vertices to the opposite sides of a triangle)

Ceva’s theorem is a theorem about triangles in Euclidean plane geometry. Given a triangle ABC, let the lines AO, BO and CO ... more

Sum of the ratios on the three altitudes of the distance of the orthocenter from the base to the length of the altitude

Altitude of a triangle is a line segment through a vertex and perpendicular to a line containing the base (the opposite side of the triangle). This line ... more

1st medians' theorem - Apollonius' theorem

Relates the length of a median and the sides of an arbitrary triangle

... more

Area of rhombus (by diagonals)

Rhombus is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral whose four sides all have the same length. Every rhombus is a parallelogram, and a rhombus with ... more

Distance of the focal point from the center of an ellipse

Ellipse is a curve on a plane surrounding two focal points such that a straight line drawn from one of the focal points to any point on the curve and then ... more

Length of the perimeter of a circular sector

Circular arc is a segment of a circle. A circular sector or circle sector is the portion of a disk enclosed by two radii and an arc, where the smaller area ... more

Area of a Disc (integral)

Calculates the area of a disc of radius r or the area enclosed in a circle of radius r. Partitioning the disk into thin concentric rings, like the layers ... more

Richter magnitude scale

assigns a magnitude number to quantify the energy released by an earthquake. The Richter scale is a base-10 logarithmic scale, which defines magnitude as ... more

Law of sines ( related to the sides of the triangle)

Law of sines is an equation relating the lengths of the sides of any shaped triangle to the sines of its angles. The law of sines can be used to compute ... more

Law of tangents for the triangles

The law of tangents is a statement about the relationship between the tangents of two angles of a triangle and the lengths of the opposing sides.The law of ... more

...can't find what you're looking for?

Create a new formula