'

Search results

Found 1745 matches
Angle required to hit polar coordinate (x,y) - (projectile following a ballistic trajectory)

In physics, the ballistic trajectory of a projectile is the path that a thrown or launched projectile or missile without propulsion will take under the ... more

Centripetal Force - angular velocity

Centripetal force (from Latin centrum “center” and petere “to seek”) is a force that makes a body follow a curved path: its ... more

Wind loading - takeoff speed

In aerodynamics, wing loading is the total weight of an aircraft divided by the area of its wing. The stalling speed of an aircraft in straight, level ... more

Electron's energy

n atomic physics, the Rutherford–Bohr model or Bohr model, depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in ... more

Energy – Momentum relation

In physics, the energy–momentum relation, or relativistic dispersion relation, is the relativistic equation relating any object’s rest (intrinsic) ... more

Polar coordinates of a line

In mathematics, the polar coordinate system is a two-dimensional coordinate system in which each point on a plane is determined by a distance from a fixed ... more

Conic section (polar system and one focus on the pole and the other somewhere on the 0° ray )

conic section (or just conic) is a curve obtained as the intersection of a cone (more precisely, a right circular conical surface) with a plane. A conic ... more

Stokes's Law of Sound Attenuation

Stokes’s law of sound attenuation is a formula for the attenuation of sound in a Newtonian fluid, such as water or air, due to the fluid’s ... more

True anomaly - as a function of eccentric anomaly, Tan form

In celestial mechanics, true anomaly is an angular parameter that defines the position of a body moving along a Keplerian orbit. It is the angle between ... more

True anomaly - as a function of eccentric anomaly, sin form

In celestial mechanics, true anomaly is an angular parameter that defines the position of a body moving along a Keplerian orbit. It is the angle between ... more

...can't find what you're looking for?

Create a new formula