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Self-buckling critical height ( for a free-standing, vertical column)

Column or pillar in architecture and structural engineering is a structural element that transmits, through compression, the weight of the structure above ... more

Solute flux (Forward osmosis)

Forward osmosis (FO) is an osmotic process that, like reverse osmosis (RO), uses a semi-permeable membrane to effect separation of water from dissolved ... more

Ripple voltage (half-wave rectifier))

The most common meaning of ripple in electrical science is the small unwanted residual periodic variation of the direct current (DC) output of a power ... more

Relation between the inradius,exradii,circumradius and the distances of the orthocenter from the vertices of a triangle

Altitude of a triangle is a line segment through a vertex and perpendicular to a line containing the base (the opposite side of the triangle). This line ... more

Thermal resistance due to fouling deposits (general)

Often during their use, heat exchangers collect a layer of fouling on the surface which, in addition to potentially contaminating a stream, reduces the ... more

Worksheet 300

Calculate the Reynolds number N′R for a ball with a 7.40-cm diameter thrown at 40.0 m/s.

Strategy

We can use the Reynolds number equation calculate N’R , since all values in it are either given or can be found in tables of density and viscosity.

Solution

We first find the kinematic viscosity values:

Kinematic Viscosity

Substituting values into the equation for N’R yields:

Reynolds number

Discussion

This value is sufficiently high to imply a turbulent wake. Most large objects, such as airplanes and sailboats, create significant turbulence as they move. As noted before, the Bernoulli principle gives only qualitatively-correct results in such situations.

Reference : OpenStax College,College Physics. OpenStax College. 21 June 2012.
http://openstaxcollege.org/textbooks/college-physics
Creative Commons License : http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Sagnac effect (phase difference)

The Sagnac effect, also called Sagnac interference, named after French physicist Georges Sagnac, is a phenomenon encountered in interferometry that is ... more

Distance between two points (three-space)

Distance is a numerical description of how far apart objects are. In analytic geometry, the distance between two points of the xyz-plane in three-space, ... more

Overall heat transfer coefficient

Heat transfer describes the exchange of thermal energy, between physical systems depending on the temperature and pressure, by dissipating heat. The heat ... more

Bragg's Law - Lattice Spacing in Cubic Systems

In physics, Bragg’s law, or Wulff–Bragg’s condition, a special case of Laue diffraction, gives the angles for coherent and incoherent ... more

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