'

Search results

Found 776 matches
Free-Space Path Loss (in dB)

In telecommunication, free-space path loss (FSPL) is the loss in signal strength of an electromagnetic wave that would result ... more

Nose cone (Conical)

Nose cone section of any vehicle or body meant to travel through a compressible fluid medium (such as a rocket or aircraft, missile or bullet) has several ... more

Nose cone (Spherical)

The nose cone section of any vehicle or body meant to travel through a compressible fluid medium (such as a rocket or aircraft, missile or bullet) is ... more

Torque - to overcome rolling resistance

Torque, is the tendency of a force to rotate an object about an axis, fulcrum, or pivot. Just as a force is a push or a pull, a torque can be thought of as ... more

Allowable Strength Design Load combination (eq8)

In structural engineering, a structure is a body or combination of pieces of rigid bodies in space to form a fitness system for supporting loads. ... more

Allowable Strength Design Load combination (eq1)

In structural engineering, a structure is a body or combination of pieces of rigid bodies in space to form a fitness system for supporting loads. ... more

Stokes' law

Stokes’ law is an expression for the frictional force – also called drag force – exerted on spherical objects with very small Reynolds numbers (e.g., ... more

Nose cone Spherically blunted tangent ogive( X- coordinate of the tangency point )

The nose cone section of any vehicle or body meant to travel through a compressible fluid medium (such as a rocket or aircraft, missile or bullet) is ... more

Rankine Gordon formula (Maximum axial load that a column will buckle)

Column or pillar in architecture and structural engineering is a structural element that transmits, through compression, the weight of the structure above ... more

Friction Loss (laminar flow)

In fluid flow, friction loss (or skin friction) is the loss of pressure or “head” that occurs in pipe or duct flow due to the effect of the fluid’s ... more

...can't find what you're looking for?

Create a new formula