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Drift velocity in a current-carrying metallic ohmic conductor

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains due to an electric field.

In terms of the basic ... more

Hall voltage (Hall effect)

The Hall effect is the production of a voltage difference (the Hall voltage) across an electrical conductor, transverse to an electric current in the ... more

Richardson's law

Thermionic emission is the thermally induced flow of charge carriers from a surface or over a potential-energy barrier. This occurs because the thermal ... more

Drift Velocity

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains in a material due to an electric field. It can also be referred to ... more

Hall coefficient in semiconductors (for moderate magnetic fields)

The Hall effect is the production of a voltage difference (the Hall voltage) across an electrical conductor, transverse to an electric current in the ... more

Joule's first law

Joule heating , is the process by which the passage of an electric current through a conductor releases heat. Joule heating is depending on the resistance ... more

Drift Velocity (with current and conductor section area)

The drift velocity is the average velocity that a particle, such as an electron, attains in a material due to an electric field. It can also be referred to ... more

Plasma conductivity

Electrical resistivity (also known as resistivity, specific electrical resistance, or volume resistivity) is an intrinsic property that quantifies how ... more

Supercsapacitor - Time to deliver a Constant Current

A supercapacitor (SC) (sometimes ultracapacitor, formerly electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC)) is a high-capacity ... more

Flux (as a single scalar)

Flux is two separate simple and ubiquitous concepts throughout physics and applied mathematics. Within a discipline, the term is generally used ... more

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