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Degree of Combined Leverage

In finance, leverage is a general term for any technique to multiply gains and losses.Most often it involves buying more of an asset by using borrowed ... more

Degree of Operating Leverage

In finance, leverage is a general term for any technique to multiply gains and losses. Most often it involves buying more of an asset by using borrowed ... more

Financial leverage

In finance, leverage is a general term for any technique to multiply gains and losses. Most often it involves buying more of an asset by using borrowed ... more

Degree of Financial Leverage

n finance, leverage is a general term for any technique to multiply gains and losses. Most often it involves buying more of an asset by using borrowed ... more

Ball Screw - Driving Torque

A ball screw is a mechanical linear actuator that translates rotational motion to linear motion with little friction. A threaded shaft provides a helical ... more

Rayleigh Scattering Cross-Section

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

Probability that an electron hits an ion at ionization process

Ionization is the process by which an atom or a molecule acquires a negative or positive charge by gaining or losing electrons to form ions. If an electron ... more

Torque on a dipole (electric field)

A physical dipole consists of two equal and opposite point charges An electric dipole is a separation of positive and negative charges.The direction of an ... more

Operating Leverage

In finance, leverage is a general term for any technique to multiply gains and losses. Operating leverage is an attempt to estimate the percentage change ... more

Rayleigh Scattering - Intensity of Light from molecules

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

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