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Properties of concrete - modulus of elasticity for normal weight concrete

The modulus of elasticity of concrete is a function of the modulus of elasticity of the aggregates and the cement matrix and their relative proportions. ... more

Properties of concrete - modulus of elasticity (AASHTO)

The modulus of elasticity of concrete is a function of the modulus of elasticity of the aggregates and the cement matrix and their relative proportions. ... more

Critical Buckling Stress of a Column with Buckling Coefficient

Column or pillar in architecture and structural engineering is a structural element that transmits, through compression, the weight of the structure above ... more

Hydraulic conductivity (Falling-head method)

Hydraulic conductivity is a property of vascular plants, soils and rocks, that describes the ease with which a fluid (usually water) can move through pore ... more

Mohr–Coulomb failure criterion

Mohr–Coulomb theory is a mathematical model describing the response of brittle materials such as concrete, or rubble piles, to shear stress as well as ... more

Stress-Optic Law

Photoelasticity is an experimental method to determine the stress distribution in a material.Unlike the analytical methods of stress determination, ... more

Fatigue (Miner’s Rule)

In materials science fatigue occurs when a material is subjected to repeated loading and unloading. The failure of the material occurs when there are k ... more

Fatigue strength

In materials science, fatigue is the weakening of a material caused by repeatedly applied loads. Fatigue strength is a measure of the strength of a ... more

Creep (deformation)

In materials science, creep (sometimes called cold flow) is the tendency of a solid material to move slowly or deform permanently under the influence of ... more

Critical Buckling Compressive Loading of a Plate

In science, buckling is a mathematical instability that leads to a failure mode.

When a structure is subjected to compressive stress, buckling may ... more

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