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Rayleigh Scattering Cross-Section

Rayleigh scattering (pronounced /ˈreɪli/ RAY-lee), named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt), is the (dominantly) elastic ... more

Low-density lipoprotein - Estimation of LDL particles via cholesterol content - in mmol/l

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the five major groups of lipoproteins. These groups, from least dense to most dense, are: ... more

Low-density lipoprotein - Estimation of LDL particles via cholesterol content - in mg/dl

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the five major groups of lipoproteins. These groups, from least dense to most dense, are: ... more

Speed of Sound (air, ideal gases) - relative to molar mass

The speed of sound is the distance travelled per unit time by a sound wave propagating through an elastic medium. The SI unit of the speed of sound is the ... more

Auger electron spectroscopy - electron impact cross-section

Auger electron spectroscopy is a common analytical technique used specifically in the study of surfaces and, more generally, in the area of materials ... more

Reflection coefficient (wave normal incidence)

At the boundary between media of different acoustic impedances, some of the wave energy is reflected and some is transmitted. The greater the difference in ... more

Magnetic diffusivity

The magnetic diffusivity is a parameter in plasma physics which appears in the magnetic Reynolds number.

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Brake clamp load

The clamping load is assumed to act on all friction surfaces equally. For dry disc brakes it doesn’t matter whether the brake is of the sliding type or ... more

Reed's Law

Reed’s law is the assertion of David P. Reed that the utility of large networks, particularly social networks, can scale exponentially with the size ... more

Darcy's law

Describes the flow of a fluid through a porous medium, for slow, viscous flow. The total discharge, is equal to the product of the intrinsic permeability ... more

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