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Found 1683 matches
Time delay for a signal from Earth to a Satelite in geostationary orbit and back

A geostationary orbit, geostationary Earth orbit or geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), is an orbit whose position in the sky ... more

Gravity Acceleration by Altitude

The gravity of Earth, which is denoted by g, refers to the acceleration that the Earth imparts to objects on or near its surface due to gravity. In SI ... more

Specific Impulse

Specific impulse (usually abbreviated Isp) is a way to describe the efficiency of rocket and jet engines. It represents the force with respect to the ... more

Gravity gradiant

Gravity gradiometry is the study and measurement of variations in the acceleration due to gravity. The gravity gradient is the spatial rate of change of ... more

Pressure to depth (empirical formula - sea water)

In sea water, there is an approximate numerical equivalence between the change in pressure in decibars and the change in depth from the surface in meters. ... more

Scale Height

In various scientific contexts, a scale height is a distance over which a quantity decreases by a factor of e (approximately 2.71828, the base of natural ... more

Specific Impulse by weight

Specific impulse (usually abbreviated Isp) is a measure of the efficiency of rocket and jet engines. By definition, it is the impulse delivered per unit of ... more

Specific Impulse by weight - with mass flow rate

Specific impulse (usually abbreviated Isp) is a measure of the efficiency of rocket and jet engines. By definition, it is the impulse delivered per unit of ... more

Horizontal Curve - Allowable radius

The allowable radius for a horizontal curve can then be determined by knowing the intended design velocity, the coefficient of friction, and the allowed ... more

Flattening - 1st variant

Flattening is a measure of the compression of a circle or sphere along a diameter to form an ellipse or an ellipsoid of revolution (spheroid) respectively. ... more

Weight

In science and engineering, the weight of an object is usually taken to be the force on the object due to gravity.
In Newtonian physics the weight is ... more

Radau parameter - related to Darwin / Radau equation

In astrophysics, the Darwin / Radau equation gives an approximate relation between the moment of inertia factor of a planetary body and its rotational ... more

Pump energy (centrifugal pump)

Centrifugal pumps are a sub-class of dynamic axis-symmetric work-absorbing turbo-machinery.The rotational energy typically comes from an engine or electric ... more

Rayleigh number (for geophysical applications)

In fluid mechanics, the Rayleigh number (Ra) for a fluid is a dimensionless number associated with buoyancy-driven flow, also known as free convection or ... more

Geocentric radius of the Earth

Geodetic latitude is the angle between the normal and the equatorial plane. The distance from the Earth’s center to a point on the spheroid surface ... more

Declination of the Sun

The position of the Sun in the sky is a function of both time and the geographic coordinates of the observer on the surface of the Earth. As the Earth ... more

Declination of the Sun (simplified)

The position of the Sun in the sky is a function of both time and the geographic coordinates of the observer on the surface of the Earth. As the Earth ... more

Vertical Pressure variation of the Atmosphere of Earth( exponential function of height)

Vertical pressure variation is the variation in pressure as a function of elevation. The vertical variation is especially significant, as it results from ... more

Coriolis frequency (Coriolis parameter)

Is equal to twice the rotation rate of the Earth multiplied by the sine of the latitude

... more

Hydraulic conductivity (as a function of water)

By definition, hydraulic conductivity is the ratio of velocity to hydraulic gradient indicating permeability of porous media.

Civil engineers ... more

Worksheet 290

Find the terminal velocity of an 85-kg skydiver falling in a spread-eagle position.

Terminal Velocity (without considering buoyancy)
Rectangle area

where Vt is the terminal velocity, m is the mass of the skydiver, g is the acceleration due to gravity, Cd is the drag coefficient, ρ is the density of the fluid through which the object is falling, and A is the projected area of the object.

Reference : OpenStax College,College Physics. OpenStax College. 21 June 2012.
http://openstaxcollege.org/textbooks/college-physics
Creative Commons License : http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

where h is skydiver height and w the width at “spread-eagle” position

Specific gravity of solids

Silts, sands and gravels are classified by their size, and hence they may consist of a variety of minerals. Owing to the stability of quartz compared to ... more

Wind loading - takeoff speed

In aerodynamics, wing loading is the total weight of an aircraft divided by the area of its wing. The stalling speed of an aircraft in straight, level ... more

Horizontal Curve - Degree of curve

Aside from momentum, when a vehicle makes a turn, two forces are acting upon it. The first is gravity, which pulls the vehicle toward the ground. The ... more

Self-buckling critical height ( for a free-standing, vertical column)

Column or pillar in architecture and structural engineering is a structural element that transmits, through compression, the weight of the structure above ... more

Bernoulli's principle

Bernoulli’s principle states that for an inviscid flow, an increase in the speed of the fluid occurs simultaneously with an increase in dynamic ... more

Solar Rotation

Solar rotation is able to vary with latitude because the Sun is composed of a gaseous plasma. The rate of rotation is observed to be fastest at the equator ... more

Normal force for a sinking object settles on the solid floor

When a sinking in a fluid object settles on the solid floor, it experiences a normal force.

... more

Sudden expansion of a pipe (total head loss)

n fluid dynamics the Borda–Carnot equation is an empirical description of the mechanical energy losses of the fluid due to a (sudden) flow expansion. The ... more

Terminal Velocity (without considering buoyancy)

Terminal velocity is simply the fastest speed that a falling object can reach in a certain circumstance. Different objects have different terminal ... more

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