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Area of a convex quadrilateral (in trigonometric terms)

Quadrilateral is a polygon with four sides (or edges) and four vertices or corners. The area of a convex quadrilateral can be expressed in trigonometric ... more

Uniform gravitational field without air resistance (altitude)

Free fall is any motion of a body where its weight is the only force acting upon it. If gravity is the only influence acting, then the acceleration is ... more

Crunode (Cartesian coordinates)

In mathematics, a crunode (archaic) or node is a point where a curve intersects itself so that both branches of the curve have distinct tangent lines at ... more

Gravity Acceleration by Altitude

The gravity of Earth, which is denoted by g, refers to the acceleration that the Earth imparts to objects on or near its surface due to gravity. In SI ... more

Area of a Square

Square is a regular quadrilateral, which means that it has four equal sides and four equal angles (90-degree angles, or right angles). It can also be ... more

Hot Air Balloon Lift

The hot air balloon is the oldest successful human-carrying flight technology. The first hot-air balloon flown in the United States was launched from the ... more

Perimeter of a Square

A square is a regular quadrilateral, which means that it has four equal sides and four equal angles (90-degree angles, or right angles). A perimeter of a ... more

Euler's quadrilateral theorem

In any convex quadrilateral the sum of the squares of the four sides is equal to the sum of the squares of the two diagonals plus four times the square of ... more

Area between a parabola and a chord

Parabola is a two-dimensional, mirror-symmetrical curve, which is approximately U-shaped. The area enclosed between a parabola and a chord is two-thirds ... more

Klein bagel (4-D non-intersecting parameterization y- coordinate)

n mathematics, the Klein bottle is an example of a non-orientable surface, informally, it is a surface (a two-dimensional manifold) in which notions of ... more

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