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Altitude of a triangle

The altitude of a triangle is the distance from a vertex perpendicular to the opposite side. There is a relation between the altitude and the sides of the ... more

Tangent function

The trigonometric functions (also called the circular functions) are functions of an angle. They relate the angles of a triangle to the lengths of its ... more

Cotangent function

The trigonometric functions (also called the circular functions) are functions of an angle. They relate the angles of a triangle to the lengths of its ... more

Stewart's Theorem ( for triangle's bisectors)

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Area of a triangle (related to the circumradius and two of its altitudes)

A circumscribed circle or circumcircle of a triangle is a circle which passes through all the vertices of the triangle. Its radius is called the ... more

Sine value calculator

Calculates the Sine value of angle θ(in degrees). The sine is defined as the ratio of the side opposite an angle of a right angled triangle to it’s ... more

Cosine value calculator

Calculates the Cosine value of angle θ(in degrees). The cosine of an angle is the ratio of the length of the adjacent side to an acute angle of a right ... more

Ceva's theorem (lines from vertices to the opposite sides of a triangle)

Ceva’s theorem is a theorem about triangles in Euclidean plane geometry. Given a triangle ABC, let the lines AO, BO and CO ... more

Length of internal bisector of an angle in triangle in relation to the opposite segments

In geometry, bisection is the division of something into two equal or congruent parts, usually by a line, which is then called a bisector. If the internal ... more

Stewart's Theorem

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

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