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Area of a triangle (Heron's formula)

In geometry, Heron’s formula (sometimes called Hero’s formula), named after Hero of Alexandria, gives the area of a triangle by requiring no ... more

Hyperbolic triangle ( length of the base)

A hyperbolic sector is a region of the Cartesian plane {(x,y)} bounded by rays from the origin to two points (a, 1/a) and (b, 1/b) and by the hyperbola xy ... more

Hyperbolic triangle ( length of the altitude)

A hyperbolic sector is a region of the Cartesian plane {(x,y)} bounded by rays from the origin to two points (a, 1/a) and (b, 1/b) and by the hyperbola xy ... more

Median ( for odd number of observations)

In statistics and probability theory, the median is the numerical value separating the higher half of a data sample, a population, or a probability ... more

Midsegment of a trapezoid

Trapezoid is a convex quadrilateral with only one pair of parallel sides. The parallel sides are called the bases of the trapezoid and the other two sides ... more

Stewart's Theorem ( for triangle's bisectors)

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Cyclic quadrilateral circumradius ( Parameshvara's formula )

In Euclidean geometry, a cyclic quadrilateral or inscribed quadrilateral is a quadrilateral whose vertices all lie on a single circle. This circle is ... more

Stewart's Theorem

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Median ( for even number of observations)

In statistics and probability theory, the median is the numerical value separating the higher half of a data sample, a population, or a probability ... more

Triangulation (surveying)

In surveying, triangulation is the process of determining the location of a point by measuring only angles to it from known points at either end of a fixed ... more

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