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Law of sines at the hyperbolic triangle

A hyperbolic triangle is a triangle in the hyperbolic plane. It consists of three line segments called sides or edges and three points called angles or ... more

Menelaus' theorem ( transversal line passes inside triangle )

Menelaus’ theorem, named for Menelaus of Alexandria, is a theorem about triangles in plane geometry. Given a triangle ABC, ... more

Altitude of a triangle

The altitude of a triangle is the distance from a vertex perpendicular to the opposite side. There is a relation between the altitude and the sides of the ... more

Orthodiagonal quadrilateral ( circumradii of the four triangles)

A quadrilateral is a polygon with four sides (or edges) and four vertices or corners. An orthodiagonal quadrilateral is a quadrilateral in which the ... more

Stewart's Theorem ( for triangle's medians)

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Antiprism uniform ( surface area )

In geometry, an n-sided antiprism is a polyhedron composed of two parallel copies of some particular n-sided polygon, connected by an alternating band of ... more

Low of sines in spherical triangle

A spherical polygon on the surface of the sphere is defined by a number of great circle arcs which are the intersection of the surface with planes through ... more

Regular Octagon Are ( 8 isosceles triangles)

Octagon is a polygon that has eight sides.
A regular octagon is a closed figure with sides of the same length and internal angles of the same size. ... more

Stewart's Theorem

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Medians' theorem

Relates the medians and the sides of an arbitrary triangle. Median of a triangle is a line segment joining a vertex to the midpoint of the opposing side. ... more

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