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Area of a triangle (related to the circumradius and two of its altitudes)

A circumscribed circle or circumcircle of a triangle is a circle which passes through all the vertices of the triangle. Its radius is called the ... more

Law of sines (related to circumdiameter)

The law of sines, sine law, sine formula, or sine rule relates the sine of an angle to the opposite side of an arbitrary triangle and the diameter of the ... more

Law of sines ( related to the sides of the triangle)

Law of sines is an equation relating the lengths of the sides of any shaped triangle to the sines of its angles. The law of sines can be used to compute ... more

Length of internal bisector of an angle in triangle in relation to the opposite segments

In geometry, bisection is the division of something into two equal or congruent parts, usually by a line, which is then called a bisector. If the internal ... more

Relation between internal bisectors of angles A, B, and C of a triangle and its sides

An angle bisector divides the angle into two angles with equal measures. An angle only has one bisector. Each point of an angle bisector is equidistant ... more

Area of an arbitrary triangle

The area of an arbitrary triangle can be calculated from the two sides of the triangle and the included angle.
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Inradius of arbitrary triangle

The radius of the inscribed circle of an arbitrary triangle is related to the altitudes of the triangle

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Tangential quadrilateral ( the sum of the opposite sides)

In Euclidean geometry, a tangential quadrilateral (sometimes just tangent quadrilateral) or circumscribed quadrilateral is a convex quadrilateral whose ... more

Pythagorean theorem (arbitrary triangle - obtuse angle)

Generalization of the Pythagorean theorem for the side opposite of the obtuse angle of an arbitrary triangle

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Distance between the circumcenter and the incenter of a triange

A circumscribed circle or circumcircle of a triangle is a circle which passes through all the vertices of the triangle. The center of this circle is called ... more

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