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Antiprism uniform ( surface area )

In geometry, an n-sided antiprism is a polyhedron composed of two parallel copies of some particular n-sided polygon, connected by an alternating band of ... more

Area of an arbitrary triangle (incircle and excircles)

The incircle or inscribed circle of a triangle is the largest circle contained in the triangle; it touches (is tangent to) the three sides. The center of ... more

Pythagorean triangle ( "b" side)

A Pythagorean triangle is right angled and Heronian. Its three integer sides are known as a Pythagorean triple or Pythagorean triplet or Pythagorean triad. ... more

Pythagorean triangle ( "a" side)

A Pythagorean triangle is right angled and Heronian. Its three integer sides are known as a Pythagorean triple or Pythagorean triplet or Pythagorean triad. ... more

Altitude of a triangle

The altitude of a triangle is the distance from a vertex perpendicular to the opposite side. There is a relation between the altitude and the sides of the ... more

Stewart's Theorem ( for triangle's medians)

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

Slant height of a right regular pyramid

Slant height is the height of any slant triangle of the regular pyramid, or the distance from the apex, down the side, to a point on the base ... more

Area of an arbitrary triangle related to the incircle radius

The area related to the semi perimeter of the triangle and the radius of the inscribed circle.

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Hyperbolic triangle ( length of the base)

A hyperbolic sector is a region of the Cartesian plane {(x,y)} bounded by rays from the origin to two points (a, 1/a) and (b, 1/b) and by the hyperbola xy ... more

Hyperbolic triangle ( length of the altitude)

A hyperbolic sector is a region of the Cartesian plane {(x,y)} bounded by rays from the origin to two points (a, 1/a) and (b, 1/b) and by the hyperbola xy ... more

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