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Napoleon's theorem

In geometry, Napoleon’s theorem states that if equilateral triangles are constructed on the sides of any triangle, either all outward, or all inward, ... more

Length of internal bisector of an angle in triangle in relation to the opposite segments

In geometry, bisection is the division of something into two equal or congruent parts, usually by a line, which is then called a bisector. If the internal ... more

Inradius of arbitrary triangle

The radius of the inscribed circle of an arbitrary triangle is related to the altitudes of the triangle

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Area of a triangle (by the one side and the sines of the triangle's angles)

A triangle is a polygon with three edges and three vertices. In a scalene triangle, all sides are unequal and equivalently all angles are unequal. When the ... more

Law of tangents for the triangles

The law of tangents is a statement about the relationship between the tangents of two angles of a triangle and the lengths of the opposing sides.The law of ... more

Law of sines ( related to the sides of the triangle)

Law of sines is an equation relating the lengths of the sides of any shaped triangle to the sines of its angles. The law of sines can be used to compute ... more

Area of an arbitrary triangle

The area of an arbitrary triangle can be calculated from the two sides of the triangle and the included angle.
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Relation between internal bisectors of angles A, B, and C of a triangle and its sides

An angle bisector divides the angle into two angles with equal measures. An angle only has one bisector. Each point of an angle bisector is equidistant ... more

Pythagorean theorem (arbitrary triangle - obtuse angle)

Generalization of the Pythagorean theorem for the side opposite of the obtuse angle of an arbitrary triangle

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Stewart's Theorem ( for triangle's bisectors)

Stewart’s theorem yields a relation between the length of the sides of the triangle and the length of a cevian of the triangle. A cevian is any line ... more

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