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Rhodonea curve

In mathematics, a rose or rhodonea curve is a sinusoid plotted in polar coordinates. the polar coordinate system is a two-dimensional coordinate system in ... more

Torque (with angle)

Torque, moment or moment of force, is the tendency of a force to rotate an object about an axis, fulcrum, or pivot. Mathematically, torque is defined as ... more

Near branch of a hyperbola in polar coordinates with respect to a focal point

In mathematics, a hyperbola is a type of smooth curve, lying in a plane, defined by its geometric properties or by equations for which it is the solution ... more

Fresnel reflection (Reflectivity Rs)

The Fresnel equations (or Fresnel conditions) describe the behaviour of light when moving between media of differing refractive indices. The reflection of ... more

Fresnel reflection (Reflectivity Rp)

The Fresnel equations (or Fresnel conditions) describe the behaviour of light when moving between media of differing refractive indices. The reflection of ... more

Circle equation in polar system

The general equation for a circle with a center not necessary at the pole, gives the length of the radius of the circle.
The polar coordinate system ... more

Wheel flop

Wheel flop refers to steering behavior in which a bicycle or motorcycle tends to turn more than expected due to the front wheel “flopping” over ... more

Law of sines at the hyperbolic triangle

A hyperbolic triangle is a triangle in the hyperbolic plane. It consists of three line segments called sides or edges and three points called angles or ... more

Spirograph (rotation angle of the inner circle)

Spirograph is a geometric drawing toy that produces mathematical roulette curves of the variety technically known as hypotrochoids and epitrochoids.
A ... more

Spherical Law of Cosines (cosine rule for angles)

In spherical trigonometry, the law of cosines (also called the cosine rule for sides) is a theorem relating the sides and angles of spherical triangles, ... more

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