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Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) - Load combinations (eq2)

In structural engineering, a structure is a body or combination of pieces of rigid bodies in space to form a fitness system for supporting loads. ... more

Central processing unit power consumption

Central processing unit power dissipation or CPU power dissipation is the process in which central processing units (CPUs) ... more

Auger electron spectroscopy - Electron impact cross-section (account for matrix effects)

Auger electron spectroscopy is a common analytical technique used specifically in the study of surfaces and, more generally, in the area of materials ... more

Time to reach specific temperature (related to Biot and Fourier numbers)

The Biot number (Bi) is a dimensionless quantity used in heat transfer calculations. Gives a simple index of the ratio of the heat transfer resistances ... more

Allowable Strength Design Load combination (eq4)

In structural engineering, a structure is a body or combination of pieces of rigid bodies in space to form a fitness system for supporting loads. ... more

Allowable Strength Design Load combination (eq6a)

In structural engineering, a structure is a body or combination of pieces of rigid bodies in space to form a fitness system for supporting loads. ... more

Allowable Strength Design Load combination (eq6b)

In structural engineering, a structure is a body or combination of pieces of rigid bodies in space to form a fitness system for supporting loads. ... more

Isentropic Relations for an Ideal Gas - difference entropy relative to the volume

In thermodynamics, an isentropic process is an idealized thermodynamic process that is adiabatic and in which the work transfers of the system are ... more

Isentropic Relations for an Ideal Gas - difference entropy relative to the pressure

In thermodynamics, an isentropic process is an idealized thermodynamic process that is adiabatic and in which the work transfers of the system are ... more

Worksheet 980

PPI can be calculated from knowing the diagonal size of the screen in inches and the resolution in pixels (width and height). This can be done in two steps

Using the Pythagorean theorem, for 3 different screen resolutions:

Diagonal Resolution - Pixels

Using the Diagonal Resolution from the previous formula we calculate the PPI for 3 corresponding screen sizes :

Pixels Per Inch (PPI)

Results:

10.1 inch tablet screen of resolution 1024×600 : 117.5PPI
21.5 inch PC monitor of 1080p resolution : 102.46PPI
27 inch PC monitor of 1440p resolution : 108.78PPI

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