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Absolute Magnitude of a Star - with luminosity distance

Absolute magnitude is the measure of a celestial object’s intrinsic brightness. It is the hypothetical apparent magnitude of an object at a standard ... more

Absolute Magnitude of a Star - with distance modulus

Absolute magnitude is the measure of a celestial object’s intrinsic brightness. It is the hypothetical apparent magnitude of an object at a standard ... more

Magnitude of proper motion

Proper motion is the astronomical measure of the observed changes in the apparent places of stars or other celestial objects in the sky, as seen from the ... more

Parallax

Parallax is a displacement or difference in the apparent position of an object viewed along two different lines of sight, and is measured by the angle or ... more

Magnitude of proper motion (μα*)

Proper motion is the astronomical measure of the observed changes in the apparent places of stars or other celestial objects in the sky, as seen from the ... more

Proper motion (declination)

Proper motion is the astronomical measure of the observed changes in the apparent places of stars or other celestial objects in the sky, as seen from the ... more

Proper motion (right ascension)

Proper motion is the astronomical measure of the observed changes in the apparent places of stars or other celestial objects in the sky, as seen from the ... more

Luminosity for a black body

In astronomy, luminosity is the total amount of energy emitted by a star, galaxy, or other astronomical object per unit time. It is related to the ... more

Radio luminosity

In astronomy, luminosity is the total amount of energy emitted by a star, galaxy, or other astronomical object per unit time. It is related to the ... more

Albedo - correlation with Absolute Magnitude and Diameter

Albedo (/ælˈbiːdoʊ/), or reflection coefficient, derived from Latin albedo “whiteness” (or reflected sunlight) in turn from albus ... more

Luminosity of a Star

In astronomy, luminosity is the total amount of energy emitted by a star, galaxy, or other astronomical object per unit time. It is related to brightness, ... more

Kelvin–Helmholtz mechanism

The Kelvin–Helmholtz mechanism is an astronomical process that occurs when the surface of a star or a planet cools. The cooling causes the pressure to ... more

Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution (Probability density function)

In physics, particularly statistical mechanics, the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution or Maxwell speed distribution describes particle speeds in idealized ... more

Planck temperature

Planck temperature, denoted by TP, is the unit of temperature in the system of natural units known as Planck units.

It serves as the ... more

Speed

In everyday use and in kinematics, the speed of an object is the magnitude of its velocity (the rate of change of its position); it is thus a scalar ... more

Velocity at a distance x (for object following a ballistic trajectory)

A trajectory or flight path is the path that a moving object follows through space as a function of time. A trajectory can be described mathematically ... more

Time-varying instantaneous voltages for L1 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Weight

In science and engineering, the weight of an object is usually taken to be the force on the object due to gravity.
In Newtonian physics the weight is ... more

Creep (deformation)

In materials science, creep (sometimes called cold flow) is the tendency of a solid material to move slowly or deform permanently under the influence of ... more

Time-varying instantaneous voltages for L3 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Time-varying instantaneous voltages for L2 (Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

Radial acceleration in circular motion ( related to period)

Uniform circular motion, that is constant speed along a circular path, is an example of a body experiencing acceleration resulting in velocity of a ... more

Radial acceleration in circular motion

Uniform circular motion, that is constant speed along a circular path, is an example of a body experiencing acceleration resulting in velocity of a ... more

Surface wave magnitude scale

The surface wave magnitude (M_s) scale is one of the magnitude scales used in seismology to describe the size of an earthquake. It is based on measurements ... more

Orbital Period - as a function of central body's density

The orbital period is the time taken for a given object to make one complete orbit around another object.

When mentioned without further ... more

Redshift (based on wavelength)

In physics, redshift happens when light or other electromagnetic radiation from an object is increased in wavelength, or shifted to the red end of the ... more

Redshift: 1+z (based on frequency)

In physics, redshift happens when light or other electromagnetic radiation from an object is increased in wavelength, or shifted to the red end of the ... more

Redshift: 1+z (based on wavelength)

In physics, redshift happens when light or other electromagnetic radiation from an object is increased in wavelength, or shifted to the red end of the ... more

Redshift (based on frequency)

In physics, redshift happens when light or other electromagnetic radiation from an object is increased in wavelength, or shifted to the red end of the ... more

Instantaneous current for L1(Three-phase electric application)

In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying alternating current voltages that are offset in time ... more

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